• A National Garden Bureau Special Program
  • 2014: Year of the Cucumber
    The cucumber is one of the top five most popular garden vegetables. Cucumbers are very adaptable. They have been grown in space and a mile underground in a nickel mine. Very easy to grow from seed, cucumbers deserve praise and a place in the modern garden.
  • 2013: Year of the Watermelon
    Not only are watermelons (Citrullus lanatus) delicious, they are one of the largest edible fruits grown in the U.S. It’s also one of the most useful fruits as every part is edible: the flesh can be eaten as is, the rind can be pickled and the seed can be roasted or ground into other ingredients.
  • 2012: Year of the Heuchera
    Heucheras (commonly called Coral Bells) are all-American. Literally. Different species hail from the islands off the California coast to the highest mountains in the Rockies to the Gulf of Mexico. With this diverse range of habitat, these plants are able to find a niche in everyone's garden. Breeders in America and Europe have taken a well-aimed swipe of a paintbrush between these species, and have assembled a plethora of plants with amazing flower and foliage forms that didn’t exist a scant ten years ago. Not only are these plants aesthetically pleasing, but they have become stronger, fuller, and more disease resistant. With few pests, great adaptability to containers and a seemingly unending number of forms, Heuchera should be in everyone's garden!
  • 2011: Year of the Zinnia
    For decades, zinnias have been the flowering annual of choice for spreading glorious colors throughout the garden as well as for cutting to bring indoors. But it wasn't always so. When the Spanish first saw zinnia species in Mexico, they thought the flower was so unattractive they named it mal de ojos, or "sickness of the eye!" Years of breeding have brought striking new colors, shapes, sizes, and growing habits to the humble zinnia. No present day gardener would ever describe this versatile bloomer as anything less than eye catching.
  • 2010: Year of the Marigolds
    Marigolds, native to the New World and sacred flower of the Aztecs, journeyed across the Atlantic Ocean twice to travel 3,000 miles north of their center of origin. This lengthy serpentine journey is a testimony to the rugged durability of marigolds.
  • 2009: Year of the Greens
    Their names are sometimes unfamiliar and their tastes exotic. Leafy greens are popular everywhere from gourmet restaurants, farmers' markets and supermarket produce sections to backyard gardens.
  • 2008: Year of the Eggplant
    The eggplant has been celebrated as an aphrodisiac and feared as the cause of insanity. Today it is appreciated for both its inspiring beauty and delightful flavor.
  • 2007: Year of the Cabbage and Kale
    Cabbage and kale are among the hardiest and most nutritious vegetables a home gardener can grow with ease. Both are handsome in the garden, with colors ranging from pale green through dark battleship blue, to deep reddish purple.
  • 2006: Year of the Celosia
    Celosias are one of the most eye-catching annuals to grow in the garden.
  • 2005: Year of the Melon
    According to Webster's Dictionary, melons are "the large round fruit of various plants of the gourd family, with sweet pulpy flesh and many seeds (honeydew, cantaloupe, muskmelon)."
  • 2004: Year of the Dianthus
    For centuries, Dianthus has been one of the most sought after plants for the garden.
  • 2003: Year of the Bean
    Young snap beans to eat fresh from the garden. Colorful green, purple and yellow beans. Bush beans that grow on compact stems and pole beans that clamber up tepees and trellises.
  • 2002: Year of the Vinca
    Clear flower colors and glossy green leaves make Vinca indispensable for season-long interest in the garden and in containers. Add practically no maintenance to these drought tolerant plants and you have a winning combination.
  • 2001: Year of the Basil
    Can you imagine a garden without basil? Impossible!
  • 2000: Year of the Sweet Corn
    Sweet Corn is an indisputable native of the Americas and has been consumed for 7,000 years.
  • 1999: Year of the Asian Vegetable
    The National Garden Bureau celebrates the Asian culture and the contributions to North American gardens and ethnic cuisine.
  • 1998: Year of the Geranium
    Should we call them geraniums or pelargoniums? By any name, they are definitely as sweet.
  • 1997: Year of the Petunia
    Whether edging a flower bed, covering a bare area like a ground cover, spilling out of a container or trailing from a hanging basket--petunias help keep the gardening season at its most colorful from late spring to fall.
 
A National Garden Bureau Special Program

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2014: Year of the Cucumber

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2013: Year of the Watermelon

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2012: Year of the Heuchera

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2011: Year of the Zinnia

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2010: Year of the Marigolds

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2009: Year of the Greens

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2008: Year of the Eggplant

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2007: Year of the Cabbage and Kale

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2006: Year of the Celosia

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2005: Year of the Melon

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2004: Year of the Dianthus

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2003: Year of the Bean

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2002: Year of the Vinca

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2001: Year of the Basil

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2000: Year of the Sweet Corn

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1999: Year of the Asian Vegetable

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1998: Year of the Geranium

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1997: Year of the Petunia

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National Media Attention!

In July, National Garden Bureau launched a campaign to help the Julie + Michael Tracy Family Foundation complete a 1.5 acre therapeutic garden, one that will uniquely assist young adults with autism learn important life and career skills. The story has already reached millions through major media news outlets - and you can be a part of its success, too! Take a look here:

  • ABC News did this wonderful piece on our fundraiser and the benefits of the garden.
  • Click here to see Growing for Futures featured on WGN TV news.
  • Chicago Tribune published this feature in its Life & Style section. 
  • This story appeared on WTTW's Chicago Tonight and gave a thorough look into farm workers.

The Growing Solutions Farm is located in Chicago, Illinois and is the first beneficiary in this annual fundraising effort by the National Garden Bureau.

Here's how you can support this effort: 

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Therapeutic and Healing Gardens

We hear time and again how gardeners use their garden spaces to unwind from their day, get away from it all, relieve stress, etc. So it’s no surprise to us who already enjoy gardening that working either indoors or outdoors with plants is good for the body and soul. In fact, we just read this blog post by Jane Gates touting all the health benefits of home gardening. These days, there is more and more research showing how gardens and garden tasks can play an extremely important role in healthcare, treating ailments and afflictions, teaching or re-teaching physical activities and even providing occupational training for the future. This is known as Horticultural Therapy.

 
According to a more precise definition by the Chicago Botanic Garden, Horticultural Therapy is the professionally directed use of plant, garden and nature activities to achieve measurable physical and mental health outcomes. Gardens built to achieve those outcomes are often called therapeutic or health care gardens and are designed by horticulture/landscape professionals in conjunction with health care professionals.  
 
There are numerous terminologies attached to this area of garden design and function so we will define a few of the different types of gardens that are similar to therapeutic gardens:
 
Healing gardens – A garden that supports generalized healing by helping patients who have had physical, mental, emotional or spiritual harm become healthful, well and whole.
 
Rehabilitation garden – A garden used as therapy to restore a patient’s mobility.
 
Enabling gardens – A garden used to teach and inspire accessible gardening by example.
 
Meditation/Contemplation garden – A garden space that encourages reflection for spiritual and mental healing.
 
The basic premise is the same, and that’s to use a garden (ornamental or edible; inside or outside; small or large) as a tool for physical and mental healing. Some garden tasks are perfect for someone with limited mobility and will possibly allow them to continue to live on their own and grow their own food. A beautiful garden setting with the right amount of sun exposure can aid healing in patients young and old. Simply having a garden on site of a hospital, rehab center or retirement home (to name a few) encourages getting outside and soaking up the sun. A teaching garden within a school will teach life and survival skills for children of all ages, abilities and economic backgrounds.
 
In some recent research on the topic, we’ve found multiple sources of useful information.
 
The American Society of Landscape Architects is an organization for professional landscape architects, the ones who design therapeutic gardens, and has this article on defining a Therapeutic Garden.
 
The Chicago Botanic Garden not only has an Enabling Garden on their grounds (read about it here) but also offers a Horticultural Therapy Certificate Program.
 
The Therapeutic Landscapes Network is an online community of people and companies interested in using horticulture as therapy.
 
For professionals, there is the American Horticulture Therapy Association that assists their members advance the practice of horticulture as therapy.
 
All gardeners should understand the many ways gardening is beneficial and encourage the establishment of therapeutic gardens in their own communities. National Garden Bureau is passionate about inspiring more people to garden and horticulture therapy just gives us one more great reason to promote gardening. The more we know, the more we can help!

  • Angelonia 'Serena Blue'

    This fresh color addition to the Serena series performs beautifully in both single and mixed containers. The mid-blue flower spikes are prolific and continue to flower throughout the summer. 'Serena Blue' fills containers nicely, and the blue spikes complement other annuals, particularly in the red or yellow color class.

  • Impatiens 'SunPatiens Compact Hot Coral'

    These remarkable plants represent a breeding breakthrough: robust, sun-loving, heat-loving New Guinea-type impatiens that thrive in full sun or part shade and deliver continuous color from spring through hard frost. Unaffected by downy mildew, SunPatiens® are an excellent alternative to seed impatiens, offering non-stop color and impressive 3-to-1 coverage in the garden.
    With shorter internodes and exceptional branching for dense, bushy plants, the Compact SunPatiens grow 16-32 inches/40-80 cm tall and 14-24 inches/35-60 cm wide in the landscape.

  • Gerbera Garvinea® 'Sweet Glow®'

    Garvinea® is the first true garden Gerbera. It's a unique series of robust garden plants with an unexpected feature: continuous outdoor flowering from early spring until the first frost. In mild climates it even flowers year-round! This season the true Power Flower goes BIG, BIGGER, BIGGEST! The series is extended with a cheerful SWEET range of large flowered varieties, containing the same reliable and sturdy habits as the classic Garvinea®. Garvinea 'Sweet Glow®' adds bright orange to your garden borders, terrace or balcony.

  • Dianthus ‘Bouquet™ Rose’ F1
    Use this cool season first year flowering perennial as a tall garden item and as a backyard cut flower. The fragrant brightly colored half inch flowers attract bees and butterflies. The lacy, eye catching deep rose blooms are held on upright plants 18 to 24 inches tall that spread 10 to 12 inches wide. The strong stems make ideal cut flowers and do not require staking. Low maintenance, frost tolerant perennial (to zone 4.)
  • Sunflower 'Miss Mars'

    'Miss Mars' is one uncommonly gorgeous sunflower! Standout variety’s flowers, leaves and stems are suffused with dark-red-to-purple hues. Low-growing, vigorously branching flame-type 20-30” tall sunflower’s merlot-colored ray petals transition to a pretty pink.

 

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Dummen Group

Dümmen was founded in 1962. Since then we have earned an international reputation as an outstanding breeder and producer of young plants. This reputation creates a high degree of responsibility. It is our company policy to accept and live up to this responsibility. Our staff dedication, uncompromising selection procedures and the expertise which has acumulated over the years has been rewarded by a loyal and expanding customers base. Dümmen offers a variety of products: * Poinsettias * Geranium * Osteospermum * New Guinea Impatiens * Petunias * Calibrachoa * Begonias * Verbenas

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